12 Times “Cutthroat Kitchen” Sabotages Came From Satan Himself

Cutthroat Kitchen quickly rose to become one of the most popular shows on the Food Network. Hosted by Alton Brown, four chefs compete against each other to win a cash prize. Each chef starts with $25,000 and as the show goes on, they can buy sabotages for their fellow contestants. They have to be careful, though. If they do end up winning, they only take home whatever is left of their $25,000.

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But sometimes the sabotages contestants are given seem to cruel, even for a TV show that is literally about being cutthroat. These are some of the most intense sabotages to ever be thrown at contestants.

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One chef had to make gnocchi with his dominant hand taped to a potato masher. It was all fine until he ended up getting his hand stuck in the oven handle. Alton had to help him out, but it took a little time to get free.

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This sabotage has popped up a few times, and it’s pretty terrible. Chefs have to make all their cooking utensils, pots, and pans, from giant balls of tinfoil before they start cooking. Not ideal, to say the least.

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What’s more complicated than making crepes? Making crepes in a pan that is bent out of shape. Good luck getting that perfectly round shape and thin consistency.

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You only have 30 seconds to shop in Cutthroat Kitchen, which is hard enough in itself. But sometimes contestants lose their ingredients to a sabotage, and that’s exactly what happened here. This chef had to collect ingredients by inserting quarters into a gumball machine and hoping for the best.

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Having to cook in a kitchen with four other chefs running around can be tricky, but it become even worse when all your cooking has to be done inside a two-level cat house. One chef on top, one on the bottom, both in agony.

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Now, I’ve never had to chisel anything out of a brick of ice before, but I don’t think it’s that easy. I’d be willing to bet that the chefs who had to chisel all their ingredients out of an ice block, then cook an entire meal all in a span of 30 minutes would agree with me.

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Moving around in a ball pat is a lot harder than we remember it being as kids. Unfortunately for this chef, he had to prep his entire meal while inside of one. Those balls aren’t the most solid of work spaces, so it was a bit of a struggle.

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One episode was Superbowl themed, and all the dishes were somehow related to sports. The sabotages were also particularly awful, like when two chefs had to abandon their cooking stations and make chicken wings while on bleachers. Not only that, but they could only use ingredients they found “leftover” on the stands, like a half-eaten hot dog.

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Club sandwiches are a pretty standard sandwich, but there is nothing standard about having to cut and prep everything using run-of-the-mill golf clubs. In fact, some might say it’s downright evil!

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The tiny kitchen is a Cutthroat Kitchen fan favorite, where chefs have to cook their entire meal from a pint-sized kitchen that even a toddler would find small. Everything always comes out miniature, and chefs will spend a lot of money to avoid this sabotage.

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There aren’t many times in a day when I would say no to an ice cream cone, but I might have to if it meant I also had to wear the cone of shame.

In this particular instance, Chef Kyle chose not to spend ANY of his money on sabotages because he wanted to try and win the full $25,000.

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Swinging hammocks are definitely relaxing, unless of course you have to cook an entire meal on one. One chef had to prepare his pineapple upside down cake on a swinging hammock, and it was the least relaxing a hammock has ever been.

The chef’s tools kept falling through the holes, and he couldn’t keep anything standing up.

What do you think the worst sabotage is?

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