9 Songs Way Bigger Than The Movies That Inspired Them

Hit movies and hit songs don’t necessarily go together. Sure sometimes they’ll both be the top of their respective charts, like a Hollywood “It” couple that just can’t do anything wrong. Think Titanic and My Heart Will Go On. More frequently you’ll see a movie create a splash, but the song written for it will barely create a ripple on the chart.

Sometimes a song is so big that is actually dwarfs the movie that inspired it. Like the forgotten Hemsworth brother, the movie has to watch from the shadows as the song rakes in the cash and adulation.

Sucks for the movie, but it’s great for us!

We’ve made a list of 11 songs that made their movies green with envy.

1.) Que Sera, Sera (Whatever Will Be Will Be)

Bizarrely this tune frequently sung among children is actually from an Alfred Hitchcock movie. Decidedly unfit for children the movie is a wartime spy drama. The song, originally performed by Doris Day, is one of those catchy tunes that everyone knows a little bit of, but few know all of.

2.) Call Me

Blondie is the bomb. Well Debbie Harry is. She’s the supercool badass that you’d expect from a legendary rocker, and the makers of American Gigolo should have known that. Sure the movie is responsible for giving us Richard Gere, but Call me, written for the movie, has stood the test of time where as the movie….well hasn’t.

3.) Gangsta’s Paradise

I have gotten into literal fights defending the lyrical masterpiece that is Coolio’s iconic Gangsta’s Paradise. There are two things everyone knows about Coolio. One is his hair, and the second is this song. Whenever you create something that can be as memorable as a do like that, you know you have something special. What a lot of people don’t know is that Gangsta’s Paradise was written for the movie Dangerous Minds which is sadly underrated. (You’ll probably remember the movie poster though.)

Are we bringing back some memories yet? Just because these songs were bigger than the movies that spawned them, that doesn’t mean that those movies aren’t worthy of a re-watch. Take these next for example.

4.) Mrs. Robinson

Simon and Garfunkel will be remembered forever as one of the best music duos. While Sound of Silence is iconic, their tune Mrs. Robinson is also great. The movie The Graduate is also a treasure, and there’s a reason the name “Mrs. Robinson” probably rings a bell. The song was written for this Oscar winning movie.

5.) Can’t Fight The Moonlight

Okay this one is bound to be controversial. Can’t Fight The Moonlight was a giant hit from the very talented, but even more annoying, Leanne Rimes. The movie which launched it Coyote Ugly was a cult classic which some of us will die defending. It’s not everyone’s cup of tea, but maybe after a few drinks you’ll be glad you took it home.

6.) Because You Loved Me

There was a time in the 90s where you didn’t make a movie without having Celine Dion belt out a few lyrics for you. If you missed this crucial step you were giving away millions of dollars in soundtrack sales. Thankfully for the mid-90s romance Up Close and Personal they adhered to this practice. Because You Loved Me is arguably one of Dion’s best love songs, but the movie, starring Robert Redford and Michelle Pfeiffer, stands up to the over-the-top emotion that we can’t help loving.

You can never tell just what’s going to make it big whenever you make a movie/song, if you could you’d be working in Hollywood and have way more money. There is one thing that tends to connect the movies with bigger songs though: they are guilty pleasures.

7.) How Do I Live Without You

Con Air has a rather strange distinction of spawning two hit songs of the same name. That’s because Leanne Rimes was the first one to record How Do I Live Without You but they thought it sounded too poppy. They turned to Trisha Yearwood to record the song and that’s the one you hear on the soundtrack. Both are great, but the movie is so bad in the best kind of ways.

8.) I Will Always Love You

The Bodyguard was a hit movie, but Whitney Houston’s I Will Always Love You is the type of song I wouldn’t be surprised to see as the center of a religion 1,000 years from now. Bow down to the epic ballad! The movie hit all the high notes too, romance, drama, Kevin Costner in his prime. Is the writing and acting stilted? Of course it is. Do we care? You know we don’t!

9.) Everything I Do (I Do It For You)

If it has parentheses in the name you just know you’re in for a treat. Bryan Adams was never better than he was when he recorded Everything I Do (I Do It For You) and Kevin Costner was agruably never worse than when he was a half-British half-American Robin Hood. It’s still a movie I’ve seen a million times and I won’t stop inflicting it upon myself any time soon.

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