The Civil War In Color – Painstakingly Remastered Images Of A Divided America That Recreate Era In Amazing Detail

150 years after the event of the Civil War, two professional colorists, Jordan Lloyd, 27, from Britain and Mads Madsen, 19, from Denmark, have combined their skills to reconstruct some of the most iconic photographs of the American Civil War.

In this article you will find a collection of photographs which have been restored and colorized. One of the photographs which date back as early as 1862 is a shot of President Lincoln at the Battle of Antietam. One of the most famous scenes is of the end of hostilities between Robert E Lee and Ulysses S Grant where Lee surrendered outside the courthouse in Appomattox in Northern Virginia on April 9th, 1069. This surrender marked the end of four years of open hostility between the two men and is a landmark in American history.

The restoration and colorization process of these iconic photographs is by no means an easy feat. The work on one picture can take up to 4 hours! The end result is a completely different perspective on the Civil War.

Allan Pinkerton, President Lincoln, and Maj. Gen. John A. McClernand; another view. Photograph from the main eastern theater of the war, Battle of Antietam, September-October 1862. Date Created/Published: 1862 October 3.

1862. Allan Pinkerton, President Lincoln, and Maj. Gen. John A. McClernand at Antietam.

The staff of Gen. Fitz-John Porter. Lieutenant William G. Jones and George A. Custer reclining at Falmouth, Va. 1863

Prisoners of war: This colorized image and its original black and white stenograph taken by Mathew Brady in 1863 on top of Seminary Ridge in Gettysburg from the main eastern theater of the war show three Confederate prisoners

Prisoners of war: This colorized image and its original black and white stenograph taken by Mathew Brady in 1863 on top of Seminary Ridge in Gettysburg from the main eastern theater of the war show three Confederate prisoners

Leader: Brigadier General David Gregg of the re-organized Federal Second Cavalry Division, likely taken shortly before the division suffered considerable losses at the hands of the Confederate Cavalry at the Battle of Aldie, Virginia

Leader: Brigadier General David Gregg of the re-organized Federal Second Cavalry Division, likely taken shortly before the division suffered considerable losses at the hands of the Confederate Cavalry at the Battle of Aldie, Virginia

Original: Brigadier General David McMurtrie Gregg taken in June 1862, possibly near Fredericksburg, Virginia, taken by Mathew Brady, sits with his senior staff

Original: Brigadier General David McMurtrie Gregg sitting with his senior staff, taken in June 1862, possibly near Fredericksburg, Virginia, by Mathew Brady

In technicolor: The men's outfits are rendered in shades of blue in this amazing color version of the original picture

In technicolor: The men’s outfits are rendered in shades of blue in this amazing color version of the original picture

Robert Smalls, S.C. M.C. Born in Beaufort, SC, April 1839. African American legislator.

1865: [Washington Navy Yard, D.C. David E. Herold, a conspirator

Portrait of Maj. Gen. (as of Apr. 15, 1865) George A. Custer, officer of the Federal Army], 1865

Portrait of Maj. Gen. Ambrose E. Burnside, officer of the Federal Army, 1860-1865

Portrait of Rear Adm. David D. Porter, officer of the Federal Navy, 1860

General Robert E. Lee

War hero: General Robert E. Lee was anti-slavery but a commander-in-chief of the Confederate Army of Northern Virginia;

Lieutenant General Thomas 'Stonewall' Jackson

Lieutenant General Thomas ‘Stonewall’ Jackson, one of the most popular Generals of the Confederacy, earned his nickname after his role in the First Battle of Bull Run

Adventures of Mark Twain: Twain served for two weeks in the Confederate Army and attained the rank of 2nd Lieutenant before deserting

Adventures of Mark Twain: Twain served for two weeks in the Confederate Army and attained the rank of 2nd Lieutenant before deserting

Union Naval Captain Wright in a 3d stereoscopic image, combined to switch between the 2 photographs rapidly, creating an effect of movement.
Union Naval Captain Wright

Major General William Henry Fitzhugh 'Rooney' Lee

Major General William Henry Fitzhugh ‘Rooney’ Lee (right),  the 6’5, 250lb son of Robert E. Lee

General of the Army, Ulysses S. Grant

General of the Army, Ulysses S. Grant, Commander of the Union Forces – and a highly-functioning alcoholic

General Braxton Bragg

General Braxton Bragg, failed commander of the Confederate armed forces, but a praised hero during the Mexican-American war in which he served with Ulysses S. Grant

Union Capt. Cunningham, 1863

Union Capt. Cunningham, 1863

Compare: Union Captain Cunningham formed part of Brigadier General Thomas F. Meagher’s staff, who commanded the largely Irish contingent during the Civil War

Major General George Armstrong Custer

Major General George Armstrong Custer, famed for his last stand at Little Big Horn in 1876

Major General George E. Pickett

Major General George E. Pickett (right), who led the ill-fated ‘Pickett’s Charge’ at the behest of Robert E. Lee, against whom he bore a grudge for the rest of his life

General James Longstreet

Legendary: General James Longstreet, a General of the Confederate Forces and right-hand man of Robert E. Lee

Major General George H. Thomas

Major General George H. Thomas who pulled an arrow out of his own chest during battle

Brigadier General Henry Hopkins Sibley

Colorful past: Brigadier General Henry Hopkins Sibley was dismissed from the army after several blunders indirectly related to his alcoholism

Colonel J.B. Duman

Colonel J.B. Duman about whom there is virtually no information apart from this photograph

Brought to life: Lewis Powell (pictured) conspired with John Wilkes Booth to kill President Lincoln - Powell's job was to kill Secretary of State William H. Seward, a job at which he failed

Brought to life: Lewis Powell (pictured) conspired with John Wilkes Booth to kill President Lincoln – Powell’s job was to kill Secretary of State William H. Seward, a job at which he failed

Rear Admiral John Lorimer Worden

High price: Rear Admiral John Lorimer Worden, commander of the U.S.S. Monitor was captured and sent to a Confederate prison camp

Edwin Francis Jemison was a 16 year old Confederate soldier who died a year later at the age of 17 during the Battle of Malvern Hill, when he was hit by a cannonball (Off the record, it decapitated him if you wanna include it)

Edwin Francis Jemison, was a 16-year-old Confederate soldier who died a year after this picture was taken in the Battle of Malvern Hill when he was hit by a cannonball

Major General (Pictured Brigadier) Joshua Chamberlain
Major General Joshua Chamberlain, the ‘Hero of Little Round Top’

General Joseph E. Johnston

General Joseph E. Johnston, a legendary General of the Confederacy

Source: Time