How To Grow Your Own Cucamelons

This article takes you through how you can grow Cucamelons with a lot of ease. Not many people are aware of Cucamelons, which are vines that are edible. They are not available on the market commonly, which is why those who like it tend to have a hard time getting their hands on it.

Cucamelons are basically grape-sized fruits. Their taste is a combination of cucumber and lime. They are found in Mexico and Central America in abundance and can be found being referred to with different names.

If you are fond of Cucamelons, you will be pleased to learn that they are quite easy to grow. The whole process is easy to understand and unlikely to subject you to any confusion and trouble. With spring just around the corner, you now have the opportunity of using the guide to plant these fruits and enjoy their taste. You can harvest the seeds and replant them, thereby making this an economical option as well.

Cucamelons can be grown in pretty much the exact same way as regular cucumbers, only they are far easier. They don’t need the cover of a greenhouse, fancy pruning or training techniques and suffer from very few pests.

Sow the seed from April to May indoors and plant out when all risk of frost is over. You can even plant one seed per pot around half an inch deep and put them in a propagator at 20°C  in a greenhouse.

It can take a good 3 to 4 weeks before you can see a tiny green shoot appear.

Cucamelons are not only extra tolerant to rough conditions, but they are also ignored by pests and are resistant to diseases or other problems.

Give them a support the scramble over, keep well watered and prepare for a bountiful crop from July until the first frost. That’s pretty much all you will need to do!

TOP 10 Tips on How to Grow (and Eat) Your Own Cucamelons

Harvest them when they are the size of a grape, but still nice and firm.

Cucamelons are not only extra tolerant to rough conditions, but they are also ignored by pests and are resistant to diseases or other problems.

They make pretty, high-yielding vines that can be planted really close together to get the most out of a small space – as little as 15cm between plants around a trellis.

Read More: CUCAMELONS: GRAPE-SIZED CUKES